Another rainy day in Toronto

Stewartia pseudocamellia in my front yard

Stewartia pseudocamellia in my front yard

Weather for the ducks,
And meteorologically insane.
Some say that it sucks,
Others say a pain.
#Toronto can’t get enough,
Of early summer rain.

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A poem I tweeted earlier today, with a photo showing the upside of our really lousy weather: a beautiful landscape.

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This Autumn Day

Gingko biloba, in my own front yard.

Gingko biloba, in my own front yard.

Beneath the Gingko’s golden glow,
Reflecting lightly the year’s demise,
I found myself longing a deeper path,
The way, the want, the course to know.

Embracing all, the lifting sky,
Allowed aloft a lingering muse,
“When, if not now?” the clouds implore.
A moment’s Chance rolls by.

Break step the crushing mindless march!
Come about and lean renewed,
A tack held by the steady hand,
Of heart’s true love insured.

A clearing breeze this autumn day,
Restores where things belong,
Gives breath abroad eternal truth,
The tree, the sky, the heart are one.

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Notes:
I wrote this on Sept 30, 2010; just now getting all my misc bits of poetry moved to one place.

Gingko – A unique species of tree with no close living relatives (also known as the Maidenhair Tree). The tree is widely cultivated and has various uses as a food and traditional medicine. Its leaves turn a bright yellow in autumn. (See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ginkgo_biloba )

Break step – A command given to marching soldiers prior to crossing a bridge. It causes them to immediately change from their uniform and synchronized pace, to one which is random. This prevents the introduction of potentially destructive resonances into the structure of the bridge.

Come about – An expression used by sailors which means: to change course abruptly and dramatically. It requires a fast turn, steering into the wind, adjusting to the new direction and changing the way the sails are set to match the new course. This is also associated with “taking a new tack”; i.e. a new direction.

#16 Future Oak forest

16 White Oaks, sitting in our back yard, waiting for a good home. Not a great photo but it helps to explain the ones below.

It’s been about 6 weeks since we transplanted the acorns. Most are doing very well. The 14″ deep containers will hopefully allow them to develop a deep tap root. The whole thing gets covered with a wooden frame and wire mesh to keep the squirrels and racoons away.

#14 Oak seedling #15 – June 13

The same day we dug up the acorns we transplanted them into individual tubes. These are 4″ diameter x 14″ long pieces of vent pipe with a plywood bottom. Our plan is to give them plenty of room for their long tap roots. When it comes time to put them in their final home, we will remove the plywood bottom and slide the whole plug of soil & oak tree into the ground, without disturbing the roots. That’s the plan anyway; stay tuned.

This shot was taken on June 13. Nikon D80; 105mm macro lens; 1/30 sec @ f29.