Bird in Hand #2

Baby Sparrow, BlackBerry Z10 Photo by  © SCPotter

Baby Sparrow, BlackBerry Z10 Photo by © SCPotter

HumbleSparrowKnownByAll
HatchedAndFlippedAndTookAFall
ToMyYardAPlaceToLand
PhotoOpInMyLeftHand

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Today’s tweet poem.

Found this guy sprawled out in my back yard; Mom and Dad flittering about.

I gave him some water and a little nest made from an old cotton rag. Hope he survives.

I Spy Dragonfly

Twelve-spotted Skimmer in my front yard. Photo with Nikon D90 & 2 lens-mounted speedlights.

Twelve-spotted Skimmer in my front yard. Photo with Nikon D90 & 2 lens-mounted speedlights.

A Twelve-spotted Skimmer,
Settled in view.
Her gossamer wings,
Amazing see through.
Golden and glistening,
Spectacular light,
A gift to behold,
Such a beautiful sight.

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Tweet poem of the day.

This Beauty landed right in my front yard. I scrambled to get my camera & strobe lights set up, and luckily she (yes, it’s the female of the species) stayed for quite a while. She landed in our Euonymus at a height that was just perfectly aligned with our porch and made it very easy for a hand-held, walk-up “close encounter”.

For more on this amazing creature see: http://bit.ly/10Jz74P

#14 Oak seedling #15 – June 13

The same day we dug up the acorns we transplanted them into individual tubes. These are 4″ diameter x 14″ long pieces of vent pipe with a plywood bottom. Our plan is to give them plenty of room for their long tap roots. When it comes time to put them in their final home, we will remove the plywood bottom and slide the whole plug of soil & oak tree into the ground, without disturbing the roots. That’s the plan anyway; stay tuned.

This shot was taken on June 13. Nikon D80; 105mm macro lens; 1/30 sec @ f29.

#12 Oak seedling #15 – May 20

This is Oak seedling #15 on May 20. My wife found about 20 White Oak acorns in High Park last fall and wanted to see if they would grow. Over the winter we kept them in our back yard covered with oak leaves and chicken wire. Squirrels can smell the good acorns and eat most of them.  Even if they do manage to survive and take root, they are very difficult to transplant, due to their extremely long and delicate tap root.